1. thinksquad:

It’s been almost three years now since Commissioner Charles Ramsey issued a directive to Philly Police, letting them know that it’s entirely legal for the public to record officers doing their work and making arrests — as long as the photographer doesn’t interfere with that police work. It seems his officers still haven’t gotten the message. The ACLU today announced another lawsuit — the fifth in a series — against the department on behalf of a woman who was physically restrained from recording officers arresting a protestor. Here’s the ACLU press release:

The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania and co-counsel filed a federal lawsuit today on behalf of a Philadelphia woman who was forcefully restrained across the neck by a civil affairs officer to prevent her from recording Philadelphia police officers arresting a protestor on the other side of a glass wall.
This is the fifth in a series of ACLU-PA lawsuits aimed at stopping the Philadelphia Police Department’s illegal practice of retaliating against individuals who observe or record the police performing their duties.
“We have yet to see any indication that the leadership of the Philadelphia Police Department is requiring its officers to respect the First Amendment rights of Philadelphia residents in these situations,” said Reggie Shuford, executive director of the ACLU of Pennsylvania. “Until they get it right, we will continue to hold them accountable to the citizens they have sworn an oath to protect.”
Today’s lawsuit was filed on behalf of Amanda Geraci, a professional psychotherapist and a trained legal observer who was monitoring an anti-fracking protest outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center on September 21, 2012. Legal observers are trained volunteers who monitor the interactions between police and protestors.
After witnessing police take a protestor into custody and handcuff him inside the Convention Center, Geraci remained outside but walked over to a spot on the other side of the glass wall to record the incident. Then, according to the complaint, “Officer Brown approached her at a full run and threw her up against a pillar on the Convention Center’s facade.” Officer Brown then pushed her forearm against Geraci’s neck. Police officers quickly surrounded Brown and Geraci to block the ability of others in the crowd to witness or record the officer’s use of force against Geraci.
“I have been a legal observer for eight years at numerous protests and I have never experienced anything like this,” said Geraci. “I was shocked when Officer Brown pushed me against a column and restrained me by my neck, just for recording the activities of her colleagues as they arrested someone.”
“Once again, what happened to Amanda Geraci shows that the city of Philadelphia is not living up to its promise to protect the First Amendment rights of those who observe and record the police,” said Jonathan H. Feinberg of Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing, & Feinberg and one of the attorneys representing Geraci.
Information about filing a complaint with the ACLU-PA as well as background on the ACLU-PA’s previous lawsuits against the Philadelphia police department challenging the arrest and harassment of individuals for photographing police is available at: www.aclupa.org/copwatch
The ACLU-PA also has a social media campaign running (#PAcopwatch) to encourage people to contact the organization with stories about police harassment for recording.
Geraci is represented by Molly Tack-Hooper and Mary Catherine Roper of the ACLU-PA; John Grogan and Peter Leckman of Langer, Grogan & Diver, P.C.; Feinberg of Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing, & Feinberg; and Seth Kreimer of the University of Pennsylvania Law School.


Read more at http://www.phillymag.com/news/2014/09/15/aclu-sues-police-using-force-stop-photos-arrest/#2mHkthXw2JyPMd2z.99
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    thinksquad:

    It’s been almost three years now since Commissioner Charles Ramsey issued a directive to Philly Police, letting them know that it’s entirely legal for the public to record officers doing their work and making arrests — as long as the photographer doesn’t interfere with that police work. It seems his officers still haven’t gotten the message. The ACLU today announced another lawsuit — the fifth in a series — against the department on behalf of a woman who was physically restrained from recording officers arresting a protestor. Here’s the ACLU press release:
    The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania and co-counsel filed a federal lawsuit today on behalf of a Philadelphia woman who was forcefully restrained across the neck by a civil affairs officer to prevent her from recording Philadelphia police officers arresting a protestor on the other side of a glass wall.

    This is the fifth in a series of ACLU-PA lawsuits aimed at stopping the Philadelphia Police Department’s illegal practice of retaliating against individuals who observe or record the police performing their duties.

    “We have yet to see any indication that the leadership of the Philadelphia Police Department is requiring its officers to respect the First Amendment rights of Philadelphia residents in these situations,” said Reggie Shuford, executive director of the ACLU of Pennsylvania. “Until they get it right, we will continue to hold them accountable to the citizens they have sworn an oath to protect.”

    Today’s lawsuit was filed on behalf of Amanda Geraci, a professional psychotherapist and a trained legal observer who was monitoring an anti-fracking protest outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center on September 21, 2012. Legal observers are trained volunteers who monitor the interactions between police and protestors.

    After witnessing police take a protestor into custody and handcuff him inside the Convention Center, Geraci remained outside but walked over to a spot on the other side of the glass wall to record the incident. Then, according to the complaint, “Officer Brown approached her at a full run and threw her up against a pillar on the Convention Center’s facade.” Officer Brown then pushed her forearm against Geraci’s neck. Police officers quickly surrounded Brown and Geraci to block the ability of others in the crowd to witness or record the officer’s use of force against Geraci.

    “I have been a legal observer for eight years at numerous protests and I have never experienced anything like this,” said Geraci. “I was shocked when Officer Brown pushed me against a column and restrained me by my neck, just for recording the activities of her colleagues as they arrested someone.”

    “Once again, what happened to Amanda Geraci shows that the city of Philadelphia is not living up to its promise to protect the First Amendment rights of those who observe and record the police,” said Jonathan H. Feinberg of Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing, & Feinberg and one of the attorneys representing Geraci.

    Information about filing a complaint with the ACLU-PA as well as background on the ACLU-PA’s previous lawsuits against the Philadelphia police department challenging the arrest and harassment of individuals for photographing police is available at: www.aclupa.org/copwatch

    The ACLU-PA also has a social media campaign running (#PAcopwatch) to encourage people to contact the organization with stories about police harassment for recording.

    Geraci is represented by Molly Tack-Hooper and Mary Catherine Roper of the ACLU-PA; John Grogan and Peter Leckman of Langer, Grogan & Diver, P.C.; Feinberg of Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing, & Feinberg; and Seth Kreimer of the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

    Read more at http://www.phillymag.com/news/2014/09/15/aclu-sues-police-using-force-stop-photos-arrest/#2mHkthXw2JyPMd2z.99

  2. Posted by: cptimes
  3. ACLU

    police brutality

    philadelphia

  1. cultureunseen:

    Works by Kusakabe Kimbei.

  2. Posted by: cptimes
  1. cultureunseen:

    André Leon Talley

    October 16, 1949 (age 64)

    http://instagram.com/andreltalley
    https://twitter.com/OfficialALT

  2. Posted by: cptimes
  3. andre leon talley

    fashion

    LGBT

    black men

    african american

  1. Posted on 18 September, 2014

    11,807 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from buzzfeed

    buzzfeed:

    14 Times Laverne Cox Dropped Her Vast Wisdom On The World

  2. Posted by: cptimes
  3. laverne cox

    orange is the new black

    OINTNB

    transgender

  1. huffpostarts:

    ELECTRIFYING PORTRAITS OF MOROCCAN HIPSTERS

  2. Posted by: cptimes
  1. banchancomic:

    Korea is a tiny country: North and South Korea combined is the same size as Minnesota. But South Korea alone has 50 million people and 1/5 of them are living in Seoul.  While doing some research on more traditional Korean recipes, I thought it would be good to make a brief map of Korea and its regional produce and cuisines. Most people think Korean BBQ as the prominent food in Korea but vegetable and seafood have had more impact in Korean traditional food. Long time ago, before we started importing food from other countries in the modern era, the meat was very scarce because Korea is full of rough mountains which are not good for farming or ranching. But we are surrounded by three seas which produce different types of abundant fresh seafood that we ate raw, braised, grilled, pickled and made jerkies with. The rich, meat orientated dishes developed in Seoul and other big cities that used to be the capital at some point in Korean history. But rest of Korea were eating rustic meals made out of wild earthy plants and preserved veggies and seafood to last the harsh winters. Wasting food is like the biggest sin in Korea. When we butcher an animal, we use every part of it including their organs, bones, blood and odd parts like the heads, tails and the feet. Actually, the weirder the part is, the better it tastes! And it’s interesting to see that cold food developed way up in the north, which has brutal long winters. You would expect more hearty, thick, warm meals from there, but no, Koreans from the north rather enjoyed the effect to refreshing cold meals, which are served with a chunks of ice floating in the bowl to make it extra cold. These cold noodles and soups from northern regions are now popular everywhere in Korea. Some of these recipes goes back hundreds of years and I wish to learn them all some day. 

  2. Posted by: kat-chow
  1. Posted on 17 September, 2014

    367,641 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from arthaemisia

    I love my skin!

    (Source: arthaemisia)

  2. Posted by: cptimes
  3. lupita nyong'o

    sesame street

    elmo

    Race

    Black Skin

    Pigment

    Black Women

  1. papermagazine:

The Fashion Industry FINALLY Gets Something Right. 
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    papermagazine:

    The Fashion Industry FINALLY Gets Something Right.

  2. Posted by: cptimes
  1. vintageblackglamour:

Legendary Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida and the Platters including Zola Taylor in the 1950s. Photo: Galerie Verdeau. 
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    vintageblackglamour:

    Legendary Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida and the Platters including Zola Taylor in the 1950s. Photo: Galerie Verdeau. 

  2. Posted by: cptimes
  3. Zika Taylor

    African American

    style

  1. Posted on 16 September, 2014

    44,037 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from superselected

    superselected:

    Artist and photographer Nakeya B. often uses her striking, minimalist, yet bright, direct style of photography to explore the deeply personal relationship many black women have with their hair, particularly within societal context. The images, while serene in their mood are often jarring in their familiarity. Each image can invoke a different memory for a black woman viewer. The images also deconstruct the performance of heternormative notions of femininity that are entrenched in Western beauty standards in the literal sense through performance, an interesting paradox. These standards, of course, affect black women in a very unique way and are embedded into our psyches from a young age. In her artist statement, Nakeya B. talks about why she employs photography and performance as her mediums.

    My photographs examine the multiplicity of African –American hair through presenting it in various states whether braided, weaved, straightened, or natural. I am intrigued by its ability to communicate dual messages about a woman’s relationship to herself and to society at large. I often employ the female figure and feminine objects to render representations of black feminality and explore the changing language of beauty. Through past memories and personal observations, I use photography to examine how the racialized notion of beauty shape self-perception from a black feminist context.

  2. Posted by: cptimes
  3. hair

    black women

    black hair

    photography

    race

    african american