1. Sometimes Getting Along Comes Down To How You Say ‘Gravy’

In the hectic days before we went live one year ago (hooray!), we somehow missed the news of the passing, at age 91, of John Gumperz — a hugely influential linguist who contributed reams of research on the ways people from different cultures communicate. Had we been paying attention, we could have highlighted a story from Gumperz’s studies that serves as a useful demonstration of why code-switching can be both a potent metaphor and a necessary skill.
It’s a story about workplace discrimination. It’s a story about missed cultural signals. It’s a story about gravy.

Read more on NPR’s Code Switch.

    Sometimes Getting Along Comes Down To How You Say ‘Gravy’

    In the hectic days before we went live one year ago (hooray!), we somehow missed the news of the passing, at age 91, of John Gumperz — a hugely influential linguist who contributed reams of research on the ways people from different cultures communicate. Had we been paying attention, we could have highlighted a story from Gumperz’s studies that serves as a useful demonstration of why code-switching can be both a potent metaphor and a necessary skill.

    It’s a story about workplace discrimination. It’s a story about missed cultural signals. It’s a story about gravy.

    Read more on NPR’s Code Switch.

  2. Posted by: jairo-ramos
  3. Race

    Ethnicity

    Culture

    Gravy

  1. From Foreign Garb To Fashion Fad, Pajamas Have Traveled Far

Pajamas have been challenging American sartorial sensibilities for a century in the softest, warmest, most cozy way possible — Pajama Boy was just the latest victim. Are they nightwear or daywear? Menswear or women’s? A threatening foreign invention, or all-American garb?
In the 19th century, British colonials encountered the “piejamah,” a common garment in India and Iran. It’s a transliteration of a word shared by Urdu, Hindi and Persian that means “leg garment.”
The loose set of trousers, tied at the waist, was comfortable in hot weather and worn as daywear by both men and women. (It’s still worn in South Asia today, with kurta and kurti tops.)

Read more on NPR’s Code Switch.

    From Foreign Garb To Fashion Fad, Pajamas Have Traveled Far

    Pajamas have been challenging American sartorial sensibilities for a century in the softest, warmest, most cozy way possible — Pajama Boy was just the latest victim. Are they nightwear or daywear? Menswear or women’s? A threatening foreign invention, or all-American garb?

    In the 19th century, British colonials encountered the “piejamah,” a common garment in India and Iran. It’s a transliteration of a word shared by Urdu, Hindi and Persian that means “leg garment.”

    The loose set of trousers, tied at the waist, was comfortable in hot weather and worn as daywear by both men and women. (It’s still worn in South Asia today, with kurta and kurti tops.)

    Read more on NPR’s Code Switch.

  2. Posted by: jairo-ramos
  3. race

    ethnicity

    culture

    pajamas

  1. Step Behind Closed Doors And Into The LBJ Library’s Time Machine

    This week, the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library and Museum in Austin, TX, is holding a major conference on civil rights. It’s a big deal. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Johnson’s signing of the Civil Rights Act. The legacy of the landmark legislation is as significant and complicated as that of the late President himself, who cajoled, cornered and courted lawmakers to approve the bill.

    For those of us who can’t make it, though, the LBJ Time Machine, the presidential library’s tumblr, is the next best option. It contains a treasure trove of photographs and correspondence from the Johnson White House that illustrate the extent to which civil rights was part and parcel of the day-to-day agenda in the nation’s highest office, on an amazing array of fronts.

    Read more on NPR’s Code Switch.

  2. Posted by: jairo-ramos
  1. socialmediadesk:

    Good morning everyone,

    In the building:

    REDDIT CHAT TODAY at 3PM! Today Serri Graslie organized a Reddit AMA with NPR Librarian Janel Kinlaw and Trevor Munoz on digital preservation of stuff (i.e. how do you store a VHS tape for long term? How are librarians going to save tweets and…

  2. Posted by: kat-chow
  1. Who’s Boosting Box Office Numbers? Report Says Latinos

    According to a recent report published by the Motion Picture Association of America, Latinos went to the movies in 2013 way more often than other ethnic groups in the U.S. relative to their population.

    Last year, Latinos made up 17 percent of the population, but accounted for 32 percent of frequent moviegoers (that is, folks who went to more than one movie a month). Blacks represent 12 percent of the population and were 12 percent of frequent moviegoers in 2013. Asians (and other minorities) — who compose 8 percent of the population — were 7 percent of frequent moviegoers.

    Read more on NPR’s Code Switch.

    (Photo courtesy of Lionsgate)

  2. Posted by: jairo-ramos
  1. For Latino Parents, Bilingual Classrooms Aren’t Just About Language

Right now, across the country, parents are in the midst of trying to get their children enrolled in bilingual classrooms for next September.
The motivation is usually straightforward. Parents want their kids to learn a foreign language. The thinking is that a second language will bring significant cultural and economic advantages.
But for many Latino parents (and others as well) there is something more at play; namely, it can feel like the family language is at stake. (The loss of Spanish-language fluency among native-born Latinos is a widespread phenomenon.) Bilingual classrooms are seen as a way of ensuring children will be able to read, write and speak Spanish.

Read more on NPR’s Code Switch.  View in High-Res

    For Latino Parents, Bilingual Classrooms Aren’t Just About Language

    Right now, across the country, parents are in the midst of trying to get their children enrolled in bilingual classrooms for next September.

    The motivation is usually straightforward. Parents want their kids to learn a foreign language. The thinking is that a second language will bring significant cultural and economic advantages.

    But for many Latino parents (and others as well) there is something more at play; namely, it can feel like the family language is at stake. (The loss of Spanish-language fluency among native-born Latinos is a widespread phenomenon.) Bilingual classrooms are seen as a way of ensuring children will be able to read, write and speak Spanish.

    Read more on NPR’s Code Switch. 

  2. Posted by: jairo-ramos
  3. race

    ethnicity

    culture

    npr

    bilingual

    language

  1. Why Aren’t Asian-Americans Getting Their ‘One Shining Moment’?

While we were looking at some NCAA stats on student athletes for a story last week, we came across a couple of numbers that made our eyes bulge: of the 5,380 men’s basketball players in Division I basketball last season, only 15 were Asian-American. Fifteen.
That’s 0.2 percent of all men’s players. To put that in perspective, consider that about 6 percent of the country’s population is Asian-American. (We should note here that the NCAA separates out Asian-Americans from Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in its demographic data.)
There’s an argument to be made that Asian-Americans don’t need to be proportionally represented in basketball. And sure, that’s legit. But there’s a difference between being underrepresented and being virtually nonexistent…

Read more on NPR’s Code Switch

    Why Aren’t Asian-Americans Getting Their ‘One Shining Moment’?

    While we were looking at some NCAA stats on student athletes for a story last week, we came across a couple of numbers that made our eyes bulge: of the 5,380 men’s basketball players in Division I basketball last season, only 15 were Asian-AmericanFifteen.

    That’s 0.2 percent of all men’s players. To put that in perspective, consider that about 6 percent of the country’s population is Asian-American. (We should note here that the NCAA separates out Asian-Americans from Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in its demographic data.)

    There’s an argument to be made that Asian-Americans don’t need to be proportionally represented in basketball. And sure, that’s legit. But there’s a difference between being underrepresented and being virtually nonexistent…

    Read more on NPR’s Code Switch

  2. Posted by: jairo-ramos
  3. race

    ethnicity

    culture

    npr

    basketball

    asianamerican

    Jeremy Lin

  1. The Harlem Hellfighters were the first African-American unit to fight in World War I

"The French called them the ‘Men of Bronze’ out of respect, and the Germans called them the ‘Harlem Hellfighters’ out of fear," explains Max Brooks, author of The Harlem Hellfighters, a new graphic novel about the first African-American infantry unit to fight in World War I.
"We did not give ourselves our name [the ‘Harlem Hellfighters’]," says Col. Reginald Sanders, a former commander of the 369th Sustainment Brigade, which descended from the original World War I unit. "Our enemies gave us our name, [which] is an honor."

Read or listen to the story on NPR’s Code Switch.

    The Harlem Hellfighters were the first African-American unit to fight in World War I

    "The French called them the ‘Men of Bronze’ out of respect, and the Germans called them the ‘Harlem Hellfighters’ out of fear," explains Max Brooks, author of The Harlem Hellfighters, a new graphic novel about the first African-American infantry unit to fight in World War I.

    "We did not give ourselves our name [the ‘Harlem Hellfighters’]," says Col. Reginald Sanders, a former commander of the 369th Sustainment Brigade, which descended from the original World War I unit. "Our enemies gave us our name, [which] is an honor."

    Read or listen to the story on NPR’s Code Switch.

  2. Posted by: jairo-ramos
  3. race

    culture

    npr

    African-American

    WWI

    history

  1. #aprilfools
npr:

In an age of readily available information and countless ways to get it, we seem to be losing touch with our powers of comprehension.
“Why Doesn’t America Read Anymore?”

    #aprilfools

    npr:

    In an age of readily available information and countless ways to get it, we seem to be losing touch with our powers of comprehension.

    Why Doesn’t America Read Anymore?

  2. Posted by: kat-chow
  1. Lending Circles Help Latinas Pay Bills And Invest

Cuban-American Barb Mayo describes a tanda like this: “It’s like a no-interest loan with your friends.” Mayo had never heard of tandas growing up, and it wasn’t until she started working in sales for a cable company in Southern California that she was introduced to the concept.
Here’s an example of how a tanda works: Ten friends, family or co-workers get together, and each agrees to give $100 every two weeks to the group’s organizer. One person ends up with the whole pot at the end of the month: $2,000. This goes on for 10 months until everyone gets the pot.

Read more on NPR’s Code Switch

    Lending Circles Help Latinas Pay Bills And Invest

    Cuban-American Barb Mayo describes a tanda like this: “It’s like a no-interest loan with your friends.” Mayo had never heard of tandas growing up, and it wasn’t until she started working in sales for a cable company in Southern California that she was introduced to the concept.

    Here’s an example of how a tanda works: Ten friends, family or co-workers get together, and each agrees to give $100 every two weeks to the group’s organizer. One person ends up with the whole pot at the end of the month: $2,000. This goes on for 10 months until everyone gets the pot.

    Read more on NPR’s Code Switch

  2. Posted by: jairo-ramos
  3. race

    ethnicity

    culture

    latino

    Latina